Authentically Handcrafted Buckskin Clothing & Wampum Weaving
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Men's Frontier Buckskin Clothing

On This Page:

Coats/Jackets Pants

Breechclouts

Leggings Shirts

eagle feather Important Notes
1.  We use drawings for buckskin clothing and some accessories to better emphasize subtle differences that would otherwise blend in with photographs.
2.   Museum researched  = Product patterned from original Euro- and Native American items or detailed descriptions in original journals or research materials.

eagle feather About Men's Frontier Buckskin Clothing ...
On the frontier and in small settlements on the frontier's fringes, the preferred material for buckskin clothing was Indian tanned buckskin.  Naturally, Native Americans preferred Indian tanned hides.  They were easier to produce and cheaper if you had to buy or trade for them.  Indian tanned buckskin is also more comfortable - being able to breath better than commercial tanned buckskin, since the membrane was removed from both sides of the hide.

Native American men's buckskin clothing in the east was fully hand-sewn at least since the time of Euro-contact.  In the west, though, their buckskin clothing was generally only sewn along the shoulder seam, around the arm hole, and for a few inches up the sleeve from the wrist.  Breechclouts were also sewn together if they had to use more and one piece of buckskin to get the length they needed.  The rest of Indian men's clothing was thonged together until the mid to late 1800's.

Except for the occasional independent mountain man (free trapper) who might adopt the Indian style of dress, Euro-Americans preferred their clothing to be fully sewn on all seams.  Longhunters often adapted to the style of buckskin clothing of the Indian nation they were most familiar with.  A frontiersman (think Daniel Boone or Simon Girty) generally preferred his buckskin clothing to resemble his Euro-style clothing.  The mountain man's style of buckskin clothing was usually a blend of Euro- and Native American styles.

Indian tanned buckskin is already well stretched during the tanning process.  Commercial tanned buckskin is not, and will produce a lot of bag and sag at the butt and knees after only a few wearings of the garment.  Therefore, if you order leggings, pants, or a breechclout to be made of commercial tanned buckskin, we take the extra time to pre-stretch the hide(s) to minimize that stretching out of shape and size.  Also, we do not lace or machine sew our clothing.  Hand-sewing is all done with smaller authentic stitches to produce higher quality, more authentic buckskin clothing.

eagle feather For More Info ...
Read our info articles about How We Make our buckskin products or the article series about original buckskin clothing.

Breechclouts: Eastern Breechclouts Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
  Western Breechclouts Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
  Western Ceremonial Breechclouts Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
Coats: Eastern Woodsman's Frock Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
  Mountain Man Elk Skin Coat Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
Leggings: Eastern Side Seam Leggings Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
  Eastern Center Seam Leggings Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
  Eastern Algonquin Side Seam Leggings Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
  Cherokee Fringed Side Seam Leggings Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
  Northern/North Central Plains Leggings Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
  Southern/South Central Plains Leggings Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
Pants: Frontiersman Pants
  Rifleman Pants
Shirts: Eastern Woodlands Shirt Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
  Frontiersman Shirt
  Mountain Man Shirt Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
  Trapper's Jacket-Shirt Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
  Early Style Northern Plains Shirt Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
    "       "    Central Plains Shirt Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
    "       "    Southern Plains Shirt Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
  Late Style Northern Plains Shirt Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
    "       "    Central Plains Shirt Museum researched men's buckskin clothing
    "       "     Southern Plains Shirt Museum researched men's buckskin clothing

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Copyright Jan 1999-2008, Gary A. Reneker. All rights reserved. All text, graphics, programming, and coding are protected by U.S. and International Copyright Laws, and may not be copied, reprinted, published, translated, hosted, or otherwise distributed by any means without explicit permission from Gary A. Reneker.